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Using Gardening to Address Social Isolation

Started by Growing Support May 3. 0 Replies

How You Can Help Tackle Social Isolation in Your CommunityRecent research shows up to 50% of older people living in care never go outside and they are twice as likely to experience severe loneliness…Continue

Mini community garden in Watchet

Started by charles birch. Last reply by Mrs Susan Calvo Oct 12, 2016. 1 Reply

On the 14th. of march we set up a very small veg. bed. see U tube" admirals corner incredidible edible"on the17th. of June we harvested the potatoes. they were first 'Earlies' and made just over 21…Continue

job opportuntiy

Started by Alison Hayward. Last reply by Alison Hayward May 30, 2015. 1 Reply

South somerset Mind (Yeovil) is looking for a horticultural therapist for the Vanessa project.The role is paid for 6 hours a week at £10 per hour.  Please phone Gill on 01935 474875 for further…Continue

Tags: therapy, horticultural, work, job

Surplus Produce

Started by David Croxton. Last reply by Caroline Lewis Sep 25, 2014. 10 Replies

As part of our InQEDible Edible Project, and as a member of the Incredible Edible Network, we are not only looking to grow crops on spare land in our local communities, but also to persuade our local…Continue

Tags: gardens, fruit, community, Quantocks, poverty

Surplus & Abundance Projects

Why Abundance Projects?

http://growsheffield.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/fruithous11.jpgEvery autumn, apples remain rotting in the ground, hedgerows fill with fruit and some people grow more they can eat and good food lies on a compost heap. The aim of Abunance Projects are therefore to capture this surplus and re-distribute it.

Pat Thomas describes in Stuffed! “Fruit trees are not the preserve of private gardens. In cities all over the UK there are fruit trees growing on public land, in parks and car parks, along streets and cycle paths, in schools and churchyards. Some are in people’s gardens, but never get used. Often fruit goes unpicked and unappreciated and is eventually wasted.

Abundance projects harvest the bounty and give it to those that need it most. Fruit is pressed into juice, made into jams and pickles or sold loose at reduced rates to local families who otherwise would not have access to fresh fruit.

How to start an Abundance Project

The best guide available has been put together by pioneers Grow Sheffield, who started the Sheffield Abundance Group. Download it here.

Inspiring Examples in Somerset

InQEDible Edible

http://www.thequantockhills.co.uk/images/uploads/quantock%20eco%20logo.jpgDavid Croxton from Quantock Eco says, “As part of our InQEDible Edible Project, and as a member of the Incredible Edible Network, we are not only looking to grow crops on spare land in our local communities, but also to persuade our local gardeners to let us have any surplus produce once they have looked after friends and family.

These surpluses are all going to help less fortunate families in our community via Family Support Workers, and any over going to local FoodBanks that will take fresh food crops. In addition, we are working closely with FareShare (www.fareshare.org.uk) to encourage local growers and processors to donate their outgrades, misshapes etc. We will arrange collection and also need volunteers to help with tending an increasing number of gardens and plots in West Somerset and the Quantocks area. Please email David at Quantock Eco (www.quantockeco.org.uk) or via IE Somerset..Also on Twitter via TWUBS.com #quantockeco”

Transition Athelney Food Yards & Fruits of Athelney

The idea of Fruits of Athelney grew out of Transition Athelney’s (TA’s) Food Yards scheme, which encourages growers with surplus fruit and vegetables to sell these through our local shop. Click here for more information.

Links & Resources

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